10.7.14

Auteur auteur!

" ... it's Nick bloody Cave." said artist James Powditch who has suffered for his newest work of art and suffered also the imperious household staff of Nicholas who does not even answer a question these days.

His mind-reading PA replies for him  "Nick wouldn't like to wear a hat" when Powditch requests one for his portrait sitting which has been completed and hung today as a finalist for The AGNSW Archibald 2014.

'The Archibald Prize' for "the best portrait of some man or woman distinguished in Art, Letters, Science or Politics" is regarded as the most prestigious art prize in Australia, and the cash component is now about $75,000. First awarded in 1921 with a bequest by funny Geelong-born guy Jules Feltham 'Archie' Archibald, who had edited The Bulletin magazine.
Several comic elements at that link are appropriate to this topic, and the The Packers Prize is an amusing element of  The Archie - in my opinion this is more relevant than the panel choice, as those men have prolongued physical experience of each work. They don't know anything about 'art' but they know what they like.
It's so Australian to cock a snoot at anything pretentious so we also have the joy of The Bald Archies - do follow that link for a good long laugh.
Cock a snoot? At King Nick?  May I commend to you James Valentine's essay for The Drum/ABC 2010 -
One-Trick Nick', which suggests the reason for Mr Nick being everywhere one might gaze -

'Nick Worshippers grew up and became rock critics and festival directors and magazine people and anytime they could they got Nick a gig. 
If Nick brought out a recording it was always five stars. 
If Nick wrote a film, it was incredible. 
Would Nick mind if we set a ballet to his music? 
Could Nick curate something for us, write a forward, could he sculpt something? Then we can write about it, and put Nick on the cover of our magazine and show once again how cool we are, because we get Nick Cave'.

Overland magazine 2009 published The Monarch Of Middlebrow by Anwyn Crawford in similar opinion:

'it is largely this ubiquity that makes me despise Cave and his work now with the passion that perhaps only a former fan can muster.'   and
'he has become determined during recent years to shape for himself ... a legacy in the country that he left behind nearly thirty years ago. 
In this at least he has succeeded very well: it is hard to overestimate Cave’s continued influence on contemporary Australian music, from ‘literate’ bands such as Augie March to any number of young post-punk revivalists looking to borrow a little bit of his old Berlin glamour. 
Add this to his revisionist – and widely seen – filmic Western of colonial Australian life, The Proposition, the various national institutions holding exhibitions in his honour, the near-universal critical praise that greets his every album, and the man begins to feel damn near ubiquitous.'
The Howard Arkley is hanging in Canberra at The National Portrait Gallery, the photo portrait of N. E. Cave in a blue wig, by his Melbourne Scene contemporary Polly Borland.

Citizen Kave has not yet got The Nobel Prize, or the cover of  "Australia's biggest selling"  Women's Weekly, and this Powditch portrait is only hung, and has not yet won The Archibald, but give him time. 

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5 Comments:

Blogger Anne S said...

I met Nick when he was a child. His dad Colin Cave was my English Literature teacher at Wangaratta High back in the 1960s, and what a great teacher he was. I also belonged to a small drama group Colin ran in Wang at that time called The Young Thespians.

Can't say I'm a fan of Nick's music, though I do like his song "I've Been Contemplating Suicide" - a gloomy masterpiece IMO

August 03, 2014  
Blogger tony said...

The Thing is,(this may be racist but.....) Nick doesnt look Australian does he?I Australian males should look blonde;muscular.tinny -in- hand and rugby-balled.Nick is confusing to me!:) But I love his music but have never seen him live.One for my wish-list.I did see Warren Ellis 2 years ago playing Manchester Cathedral.He does look Australian either..very confusing!!!!

January 16, 2015  
Blogger Sir Marshall Stacks said...

oh dear Anne I apologise for tardy recognition of your welcome visit here. It is evident from all your other writing that ColinCave was indeed a good teacher. He died in a late night car crash rushing to MEL to bail art-student Nick out of a cell. This I believe has fuelled Big Nick's entire oeuvre.
'Shivers' aka contemplating suicide, was written by a 16 year old Rowland S Howard who achieved it decades later, slowly, as a result of ingesting noxious plant residues. I always think of big famous auteur Nick as a Wiz Of OZ empty nothing and love that James Valentine piece saying it so well.
cheers to you

January 16, 2015  
Blogger Sir Marshall Stacks said...

oh Dr Tony that Aryan bleach surfie image is a Sydney beaches thing, all fake. When they were 'Stomping At Maroubra' in 1965 all the cool kids in Melbourne were right into Northern Soul Otis Tops Temps. My favourite LP then was The Art Of Chris Farlowe (see post here somewhere) which I played into onion rings I swear. thanks to internet shopping, I am expecting the CD to be in my mailbox today. he has a gigs site - if he plays Everton Hebden do not miss him and I need a full impression from you please.
My GGGgrandparents were married 1852 at StJohns Manchester, now demolished, but when Manchester Cathedral was built boatloads of criminals were being shipped to Australia and maybe that accounts for Nick's un-Australian appearance. my very best regards to you.

January 16, 2015  
Blogger Sir Marshall Stacks said...

15 March 2015 from fdrmx.com 'Nick Cave may primarily be known for his status as a musician, (fronting bands like The Birthday Party, Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, and Grinderman) but the 57-year old Australian has actually touched on several mediums throughout his lengthy and prolific career. He also is an occasional screen actor (perhaps most memorable for playing himself in Wim Wenders Wings of Desire), as well as a distinguished writer, whom has written several screenplays, novels and collections of poetry. Now, Nick Cave has announced that he will soon be making another contribution to the literary world, with a book that’s entirely written on…airplane sick bags?

Yep, the famed Aussie rocker will be releasing a book called The Sick Bag Song, which he originally hand-wrote on airplane sick bags during his 2014 North American tour with the Bad Seeds. It will be a mix of poetry, song lyrics, biographical information, journal entrees and personal musings. Ultimately though, Cave considers his book to be an epic poem that recites his experiences in the different locations he visited during the 22-city tour. Publisher Canongate Books describes the book as being a mixture of The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot, and Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson.

The book will be issued in two additions. The first one is referred to as the “unlimited edition” and will be released April 8th. It will include the hardcopy of the book, the eBook, and an audiobook read by Cave, costing about $44 in total. The latter “limited” edition will be released June 4th. It will come with an actual sick bag customized by Cave that will feature handwritten “notes, doodles or lyrics”, and two vinyl LPs of Cave’s reading of the book. It will also include two versions of the book, one a limited edition hardcover, and the other a standard edition.

Cave is also taking a very unorthodox method with the book’s distribution, as it will not be available in stores, but instead be exclusively available through a website called thesickbagsong.com. This site also reveals that there will be three events where Nick Cave will be doing public readings from The Sick Bag Song, in the cities of Los Angeles (April 8), New York City (April 10), and London (April 16). Also, next week Cave will begin to release a series of short films to promote the book. They will be directed by Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard, whom previously helmed last year’s Nick Cave semi-documentary 20,000 Days on Earth.


March 22, 2015  

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